The Effects of Different White Balance Settings

For automatic white balance and a typical example where it does not work accurately please see here the pictures from the beginning:

white balance sample with Freddy: automatic under cloudy sky and manual
Freddy has taken a seat together with a color reference card, in a room that gets daylight from an overcast sky through large windows in the wall and in the roof.

The first picture is taken with automatic white balance and the colors are too cool, the second one with a manual white balance using a grey card.
A closer look on the reference card shows that the grey fields on the right pictures have exactly the same levels of red, green and blue while the ones on the left picture have less red and more blue.

For the manual white balance here is a series of the same subject but using different settings for white balance. The source of light with warmest colors – tungsten light – results in the strongest correction towards cooler colors and on the opposite end it is „shade“ giving the strongest adjustement towards warmer colors.

tungsten

white balance sample with Freddy: manual white balance, tungsten light

fluorescent

white balance sample with Freddy: manual white balance, fluorescent light

daylight (sun)

white balance sample with Freddy: manual white balance, sunlight

clouds

white balance sample with Freddy: manual white balance, clouds

shade

white balance sample with Freddy: manual white balance, shade

Note: If you want to create a special effect in your image it can be appropriate to use intentionally another setting than the one that is actually designed for your shooting situation.